Personal profiles of the academic staffs as predictors of professional characteristics: Basis for staff development program

PERSONAL PROFILES OF THE ACADEMIC STAFFS AS PREDICTORS OF PROFESSIONAL CHARACTERISTICS: BASIS FOR STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM A Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of International Graduate School Southern Luzon State University, Lucban, Quezon, Philippines In Collaboration with Thai Nguyen University, Socialist Republic of Vietnam In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy in Education Management LAI VAN CHINH – (TERRY) April, 2014

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i APPROVAL SHEET The Dissertation of LAI VAN CHINH entitled PERSONAL PROFILES OF THE ACADEMIC STAFFS AS PREDICTORS OF PROFESSIONAL CHARACTERISTICS: BASIS FOR STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Management In the Graduate School Southern Luzon State University, Republic of the Philippines in collaboration with Thai Nguyen University, Socialist Republic of Vietnam has been approved by the Committee _____________________ ______________________ Member Member ______________________ ______________________ ______________________ Chairman DR. CONRADO ABRAHAM DR. APOLONIA A. ESPINOSA Adviser Dean, Graduate School Accepted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Management WALBERTO MACARANAN, Ed. D Vice President, Academic Affairs _____________________ Date ii ACKNOWLEDGMENT The researcher wishes to extend his most sincere gratitude to the following people, who in one way or another, made this piece of work a reality: Dr. Cecilia N. Gascon, President of Southern Luzon State University, Republic of the Philippines, who made possible the linkage with Thai Nguyen University and the offering of Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Management, through the ITC-TUAF; Dr. Dang Kim Vui, President of Thai Nguyen University, who developed the linkage with Southern Luzon State University, Republic of the Philippines and the offering of Doctor of Philosophy in Educational Management, through the ITC-TUAF; Dr. Conrado Abraham, his research adviser, for his support and supervision throughout his graduate study program. His advice and support during the conduct of his study has greatly helped him a lot; Prof. Nordelina Ilano, Director, Office for International Affairs of SLSU for her outright assistance to the Ph.D. students; Dr. Tran Thanh Van, the Dean of the Graduate School of Thai Nguyen University, for his assistance and encouragement to pursue this study; Dr. Dang Xuan Binh, the Director of International Training Center, for his indefatigable effort to encourage the Ph.D. students to pursue this study; To all the SLSU and TNU Professors, who unselfishly shared their time and knowledge throughout the graduate studies in Thai Nguyen University, Vietnam; Special thanks to his family and friends for their support, encouragement for being the sources of greatest inspiration, which made his career a success. Lai Van Chinh iii TABLE OF CONTENTS TITLE PAGE Page APPROVAL SHEET ...................................................................................................i ACKNOWLEDGMENT .............................................................................................ii TABLE OF CONTENTS ...........................................................................................iii LIST OF TABLES.......................................................................................................v LIST OF FIGURES...................................................................................................vii LIST OF APPENDIX................................................................................................viii ABSTRACT ................................................................................................................ix CHAPTER 1 INTRODUCTION....1 Background of the Study........................................................................................3 Objectives of the study .........................................................................................6 Hypothesis of the Study........................................................................................6 Significance of the Study......................................................................................7 Scope and Limitation of the Study .......................................................................7 Definition of Terms ..............................................................................................8 2 REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12 Review of Related Literature..............................................................................12 Reserch paradigm ...............................................................................................30 3 METHODOLOGY............................................................................32 Locale of the Study.............................................................................................32 Research Design .................................................................................................33 Respondents of the study....................................................................................33 Research Instruments..........................................................................................33 iv Data Gathering Procedures.................................................................................34 Statistical Treatment...........................................................................................34 4 RESULTS AND DISCUSSION..........................................................................37 5 SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS...........................................................................61 Summary.............................................................................................................61 Findings .............................................................................................................61 Conclusions ........................................................................................................63 Recommendations ..............................................................................................65 BIBLIOGRAPHY......................................................................................................66 APPENDIX ...............................................................................................................70 CURRICULUM VITAE............................................................................................116 v LIST OF TABLES 1. Scale of values ............................................................................................................ 2. Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Age.................................................................................................................................. 3. Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Gender ............................................................................................................................ 4. Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Civil status....................................................................................................................... 5. Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Highest Education attainment.......................................................................................... 6. Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Length of service............................................................................................................ 7. Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Monthly income .............................................................................................................. 8. Frequency and Average Weighted Mean of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of working attitude............................................................................................................... 9. Frequency and Average Weighted Mean of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Mastery of the Subject Matter......................................................................................... 10. Frequency Average Weighted Mean of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Pedagogical Ability......................................................................................................... 11. Frequency and Average Weighted Mean of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Scientific Research Ability.............................................................................................. 12. Average Weighted Mean Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Ability of supplying social services ........................ 13. Frequency and Average Weighted Mean of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Ability of Ability of self-developing............................................................................... 14. Correlation of the professional characteristics in terms of age of respondents ...... 15. Correlation of the Professional characteristics in terms of respondents’ Gender 16. Correlation of the Professional characteristics in terms of respondents’ civil status 17. Correlation of the Professional characteristics in terms of respondents’ Educational attainment.................................................................................................... 18. Correlation of the Professional characteristics of respondents in terms of length 36 38 39 39 40 41 41 42 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 50 51 vi of service......................................................................................................................... 19. Correlation of the Professional characteristics of respondents in terms of Family income............................................................................................................................ 20. Correlation between Age with Professional characteristics...................................... 21. Correlation between gender with Professional characteristics.................................. 22. Correlation between civil status with Professionals characteristics.......................... 23. Correlation between Educational attainment with professional characteristics....... 24. Correlation between length of service with professional characteristics.................. 25. Correlation between family income with professional characteristics................... 52 52 53 53 54 55 55 56 vi LIST OF FIGURES 1. Research paradigm. 30 2. Location of Hong Duc university in Thanh Hoa Province 32 vi LIST OF APPENDIX Appendix Page A Correlation of the professional characteristics in terms of respondents (Multiple regressions and Chi – Square) 70 B Questionnaire for academic staff 108 Title: PERSONAL PROFILES OF THE ACADEMIC STAFF AS PREDICTORS OF PROFESSIONAL CHARACTERISTICS: BASIS FOR STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Researcher: Lai Van Chinh Degree Doctor of Philosophy, Development Education Nam/ Address of the Institution Southern Luzon State University Graduate School Lucban, Quezon Date Completed April, 2014 Adviser Dr. Conrado Abraham ABSTRACT This study was conducted to determine the personal profiles of the academic staff as predictors of professional characteristics: Basis for staff development program of Hong Duc University. It is the main objective of this study to determine if the Personal Profiles is a predictor of Professional Characteristics of the Academic Staff of Hong Duc University. Specifically, this research work sought to find out the personal profiles of the academic staff of Hong Duc in terms of age, gender, civil status, .educational attainment, .length of service, ix and .family income; to determine the professional characteristics of the academic staff of Hong Duc University as perceived by the respondents in terms of working attitudes, mastery of the subject matter, pedagogical ability, ability to conduct scientific researches, ability to conduct extension services, ability of supplying social services, and ability to self- development. Furthermore, it was conducted to find out the significant differences between the perceptions of the respondents when grouped into profiles; identify which of the profile of the respondents predict professional characteristics of the academic staff of Hong Duc University; and to propose an enhancement program based from the results of the study. This study used the descriptive correlation design in analyzing the investigated variables. A total of 508 teachers from different department of Hong Duc university were requested to answer the questionnaire. They were randomly selected using the fish bowl technique. Weighted mean was utilized to describe the leadership styles of principals. Chi- square test was used to determine the significant relationship of the instructional variables and leadership styles of principals. Multiple regressions were used to find out the predictability of the influence of instructional variables to staff development program. The statistical analysis was done using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), now also known as Predictive analysis software. Based on the results of the study, the following were the findings: The frequency distribution of the respondents’ profile in terms of age, gender, and civil status show that that most of staff’ age in Hong Duc University including teaching and non-teaching were ranging from 31-40 years old in which catered 43.3 percent of the whole distribution and the lowest was from age ranging 21-30 years old with 23.2 percent. And there were age range that was near the retirement age which 56 and above that catered only 7.5 percent. While, in terms of gender, it shows that most of the Hong Duc University Staff were male which catered 42.5 percent of the whole distribution and female respondents catered the rest 57.5 percent in which a clear indication of the university professor in Hong Duc did not x show too much difference in the number of managers and professors who can manage and teach in college or university. And in terms of status, it shows that most of the respondents were married which catered 89,8 percent of the whole distribution. In terms of the frequency distribution of the respondents’ profile on their highest educational attainment, it shows that most of the academic staff or professor/lecturer in Hong Duc University have at least attained their master’s degree which catered 46.3 percent with a minute difference in the academic staff who are stagnant with their bachelor degree which catered 41.5 percent. And 12.20 percent catered only the academic staff who have attained their doctorate degree. In terms of income levels for academic staff, those who have worked over 10 years is very stable, they have at least an income of 5000.000đ per month which is enough for ensuring their lives and families. However, the number of new employees under 10 years which was rated at 11.4% have low-income. Considering the professional characteristics of the respondents in terms of working attitude, it shows that the academic staff of the university of Hong Duc were very good in Having a good lifestyle and behavior, being a role model for students of the school where they are working with mean score of 4.88. And they were also very good in Being ambitious and keen on teaching and researching of the school with mean score of 4.86. But, they were only good in protecting, defending and implementing the rules of ethnic teacher with mean score of 3.43. The professional characteristics of the respondents, in terms of mastery of the subject matter, shows that they are good in Basic and Specialized knowledge with mean score of 3.84; Knowledge of the policy and guidelines of the Viet nam Communist Party with mean score of 3.94; and Methods of testing and evaluating the results of students with mean score of 3.80; But on the other hand, they were weak in the Knowledge of management and international integration with mean score of 3.2. xi The professional characteristics of the respondents in terms of pedagogical ability shows that the average rate of the competency assessment criteria of Hong Duc University reached 3.46% which is very high although a few are still under average on Ability of organizing, monitoring and getting feedback, evaluating from students; while 3,05, 39 lecturers are under average in Deploying educational programs and organizing scientific research activity ability and 3,27, 46 lecturers are under average It is reflected in the findings that the scientific research capabilities of lecturer of Hong Duc University is still weak with an average of 3.38%, in which: Ability of collecting and processing data and information: 3,20; Ability of writing reports and stating research results, defending views and scientific thesis: 3,24 và năng lực về Ability of organizing scientific workshop and giving feedback to scientific works: 3,19. The ability to provide social services is not high, with the Weighted Mean Average rate of 3:47%, but there are still some criteria at the average level, which is the ability of supplying various services for society: 3.16; and in the ability to Conduct mission services for the society: 3.14. In summary, the assessment of content quality and capacity of the academic staff revealed low in meeting or complying with the tasks leading to innovative and comprehensive higher education as a response to Resolution 14/2006/NQ - CP of the Government on faculty development for local universities. 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Nowadays, universities focus on building and developing core competencies and distinctive competence of lecturers to create sustainable and long-term competitive advantage that also enhance socio-economic needs of the country. It is in this context that the government has established a comprehensive educational system which is envisioned to make citizens literate, socially responsible, useful and law-abiding. A very significant factor in education in this country is the fact that the government has taken the responsibility of educating the citizenry. The learner is the most important component in the educative process and so he is the center of attention in the whole educational system. Hence, considering that the learner is the center in the training process, he must be provided with the knowledge in accordance with the times and the demands of the market. In view of this, Vietnamese universities in general and local universities in particular should take full advantage of local opportunities. They should overcome challenges, meet the elevation and development of higher education in the knowledge economy, which will contribute to the social development needs and demand of reaching up international level and joining the integration process. As stated in Article 9 of Education Law of Vietnam, educational development is the first national priority with a view to improving people’s knowledge, training manpower, and fostering talents. Educational development must be linked with the requirements of socio- economic development, to the scientific-technological advances, and to the consolidation of national defense and security, must ensure the balance in terms of qualifications, professional and regional structure, must expand scale on the basis of quality and efficiency assurance, and must link education with employment. The teacher, therefore, is a key player in the teaching-learning situation and he must be a model to all his learners in all aspects of life. Learners are good imitators and they 2 usually make their teachers their role models. It is a fact that the teacher is the manager of the teaching-learning activity, the facilitator of learning, and the evaluator of the learner’s achievements. Compared with other countries in Asia, Vietnam has the advantage of a large and young population whose potential should be tapped in order to fulfill the 2020 development vision. The literacy rate is over 90 percent and evidence of the significant efforts to date by the government to develop human resources. In the coming years, key measures to promote education and training include improving education quality through the introduction of standards for learning outcomes, teacher performance, institutional capacity, and the implementation of an effective education management. Taking into account that the objectives of higher education in Vietnam are to educate learners in acquiring political and moral qualities, endeavor to serve the people, professional knowledge and practical skills relevant to the educational levels, and physical health, meeting the needs of construction and defense of the country, teachers in various learning institutions are expected to have modern and developmental characteristics, ensuring a rational balance between basic knowledge and professional knowledge up to the international and regional levels. Moreover, guided by reality that it is the requirement of the government in the higher education must guarantee students basic scientific knowledge and relatively complete professional knowledge, scientific working methodology and the ability to apply theory into professional activities, development of lecturers is a key role in ensuring the quality of education. Recognizing the crucial issue of higher education for organization -modernization progress of the country, the Government of Vietnam (2005) issued Resolution 14/2005/NQ- CP to approve the project “renovate basically and comprehensively Vietnamese higher education in the period of 2006 – 2020”; with the desire of promoting a higher education 3 system toward more research and to move closer to international quality standards. There are 20 local universities, most of which are upgraded from colleges. Pressing issue which relates directly to renewal request of higher education in the local and the region is predicted to solve the shortcomings of lecturer development both in quantity, structure and quality. Background of the study Thanh Hoa province has an area of 11.106,09 km2 . It is situated on the top of the north central in Vietnam. It is 150 km from Hanoi in the direction of the north, and 1.560 miles from Hochiminh city in the direction of the South. Thanh Hoa has borders with Son La, Hoa Binh and Ninh Binh provinces in the north, with Nghe An province in the south, Laos Hua Phan province in the west and Tonkin Bay in the east. Thanh Hoa has 102 km coastline. Thanh Hoa is the gateway, which connects the North and the Central and the South of Vietnam. Thanh Hoa’s population is over 3.700.000 people, There are 7 ethnic groups living in Thanh Hoa, Kinh’s people takes mainly 84.75%, Muong people takes 8.7%, Thai’s people takes 6.0% and the others such as H’Mong, Dao, Tho, Hoa. Hong Duc University is a public university with multi-disciplinary, directly under the People's Committee of Thanh hoa province and managed by the Ministry of Education and Training. The University was established under Decision 797/TTg dated 24/9/1997 of the Prime Minister on the basis of three schools: College of Education, College of Engineering-Economics and Thanhhoa Medical College. Medical Department was separated and established to Medical College in October 2004. For more than 15 years of construction and development, Hong Duc University has provided training human resources and has entered into joint training to provide a large number of human resources with levels of universities, colleges and the lower ones of the pedagogy, science, economics; business administration and informatics technology; 4 agriculture, forestry and fisheries; construction, mechanics; electronics-telecommunications and electricity. Aside from the training task, the University has constantly improved the quality of scientific research to serve the socio-economic development in the process of industrialization and modernization of Thanh hoa province and neighboring areas. The university has recruited, trained and fostered lecturers and managers; enhanced facilities and equipment to improve the quality of training; promoted the scientific research and international relationships; strengthened measures of comprehensive education for students; expanded training industries to meet the growing social needs with higher quality. In the industrialization-modernization cause, educational industry not only has many new opportunities but also faces to challenges. The immediate and long-term task of Hong Duc University is to train staff who have qualities, qualifications and professional skill to meet developed requirement of the province and the country. Hong Duc University with the educational system in Thanh hoa has become the main factor which meets the training needs of local human resources to contribute to the successful implementation of the XVI Resolution Party Congress which is emphasized on the following objectives to "develop human resources, apply scientific and technological achievements, and promote educational socialization". Moreover, the university strives to meet the training needs of growing high-quality human resources of the region and the country with the mission of a university in the national education system and the network of the country's universities. The development of the university and the ability of integration into the educational system of the country, region and world entirely depend on the determination of objectives, key tasks; selection of appropriate steps and specially, the positive solutions to improve the quality of training. For over 15 years, the university has identified that the training and scientific research are two key tasks throughout the development process. Nowadays, standing in front of the requirements of international integration, with the two tasks the university 5 determines that international integration is a very important task because it is a condition for the university to reach the goal of continuously improving quality of training. The mission of the university is to train human resources for socio-economic development strategy of the country in general and Thanhhoa in particular, and be consistent with each period. In the network of higher education, Hong Duc University plays an important role in training of human resources for socio-economic development strategy of local, contributing significantly to meeting the needs of society. The university is considered as the leader in the network of universities, colleges, professional secondary schools and vocational colleges in Thanhhoa in: training, scientific research, advisory for making policies of socio-economic development of the province, is the trust address in the educational system of the province. However, reports in the past three (3) years revealed that the quality of the academic staff failed to meet the requirements of the University in terms of personnel profiles. It somehow affects the development and reputation of the University. The percentage of staff and lecturer with the doctoral level is low as observed in the different discipline which did not conform on the standard staff requirements. The foreign language of staff and lecturers is limited. Managers are mostly part-time lecturers who have not been basically trained about the management science. Shortage in the structure of lecturers are not solved, the percentage of leading lecturers does not meet the qualification standards in terms of educational qualifications with the doctoral and master’s level, as the requirements for the higher education. With this premise, it is in this context that there is a need to determine the personal profiles of the academic staff as predictors of professional characteristics which will serve as basis for the improvement of the quality of higher education and trainings. Objectives of the Study It is the main objective of this study to determine if the Personal Profiles is a predictor of Professional Characteristics of the Academic Staff of Hong Duc University. 6 Specifically, this research work sought to: 1. Find out the personal profiles of the academic staff of Hong Duc University in terms of: 1.1. age 1.2. gender 1.3. civil status 1.4.educational attainment 1.5.length of service 1.6.family income 2. Determine the professional characteristics of the academic staff of Hong Duc University as perceived by the respondents in terms of: 2.1. Work attitudes 2.2. Mastery of the subject matter 2.3 Pedagogical ability; 2.4 Ability to conduct scientific researches; 2.5 Ability of supplying social services; and 2.6 Ability to self-development. 3. Find out the significant differences between the perceptions of the respondents when grouped into profiles. 4. Identify which of the profile of the respondents predict professional characteristics of the academic staff of Hong Duc University. 5. Propose staff development program based on the results of the study. Hypotheses: 1. None of the profile of the respondents predict their professional characteristics. 2. The perceptions of the respondents when grouped as to profile have no significant difference. Significance of the Study 7 The researcher firmly believes that the result of the study could be beneficial to the following...quality as well as the wider training fields of each single school and the entire college system in the region, closely related to the features of the Cuu Long Delta area for tertiary education renovations; (5) The thesis has come up with the new ideas about open working management, enhancing the autonomy, self-responsibility of Cuu Long 2 Delta universities to develop the teacher staffs on the basis of collaboration and networking. The findings are intended to make significant contributions to Vietnam’s fundamental and entire tertiary education renovations. They can be applied widely to developing the teacher staff of Cuu Long Delta universities. The solutions are compatible with the Education and Training policies of enhancing university autonomy and self-responsibility. The initial results from developing the teacher staffs in some Cuu Long Delta universities can be duplicated in other schools elsewhere. The thesis findings also lead to further research in the field of tertiary education management: (1) Universities’ managements of teacher staffs’ quality; (2) Evaluation of universities’ training efficiency to meet the society’s demand. Before the time, Do Thi Hoa had conducted a research about policy of non-public university lecturer development. The Research Center of University Education and Occupation, Vietnam Institute of Scientific Education proposed a framework policy (CS) of lecturer development (DNGV) at non-public universities (DHNCL) in our country today, as follows: - Analyzing the theory about framework policy of lecturer development at non-public universities (DHNCL) in our country in the current period; - Presenting the framework policy of lecturer development situation at non-public universities in our country today - Presentation the lecturers at non-public universities in our country today; - Proposing the framework policy of lecturer development (DNGV) at non-public universities. Dinh Thi Hong Hai (Journal of Educational science, Number 76, January 2012) stated the solutions for teaching staff how to achieve quality improvement at Hanoi Community College. The author proposes some management measures for quality improvement in staff development at Hanoi Community College in 2010-2020. 2 Nguyen Minh Duong (Journal of Educational science, Number 76, January 2012) wrote: System approach in study of human resources development. The article addresses the system approach in research on human recourses development. According to the author, besides the components of human resources development there are also relationships and impacts of external factors to be considered. Do Tien Sy (Journal of Educational science contents, number 54 - March 2010) stated the development of research capacity by young teaching staff. Research by young teaching staff in higher education institutions has not been paid much attention to, leading to the fact that their teaching and research is stagnant. To overcome this the author proposes 5 measures to develop the young teaching staff in HEIs in the current time. Caldwell C., Truong D.X., Linh P.T., Tuan A. (© 2010 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.) stated that the University of Georgia, Athens, GA, United States; Vietnam National University, Hanoi, Viet NamStrategic Human Resource Management will serve as Ethical Stewardship. The research about strategic human resource management (SHRM) has suggested that human resource professionals (HRPs) have the opportunity to play a greater role in contributing to organizational success if they are effective in developing systems and policies aligned with the organization's values, goals, and mission. He suggested that HRPs need to raise the standard of their performance and that the competitive demands of the modern economic environment create implicit ethical duties that HRPs owe to their organizations. Further, he defined ethical stewardship as a model of governance that honors obligations due to the many stakeholders and that maximizes long-term organizational wealth creation. He, theerefore, proposed that if HRPs adopt an ethical stewardship framework and the qualities of transformative leaders, they will be more aware of their ethical duties to their organizations and more effective in helping their organizations to create increased wealth, achieve desired organizational outcomes, and establish work environments that are more satisfying to employees. 2 E. Ability of Supplying Social Services The graduates of Vermont College of Education and Social Services in the United States of America are prepared to make a difference through innovative professional practice and scholarship in a changing world. They claimed that they are proud of their mission to educate and prepare outstanding professionals in education, social work, and human services; engage in scholarship of high quality; and provide exemplary professional service to Vermont, nationally, and globally. Their purpose was to create a more humane and just society, free from oppression, that maximizes human potential and the quality of life for all individuals, families and communities. Moreover, they stated that their graduates make them proud that CESS graduates can be found around every corner in the United States and abroad, engaged in every possible sector of helping professions. In making connection with CESS people, they could extend the following:  They teach art, music, reading, math, physical education and many other subjects in public and private pre-schools, kindergartens, elementary, middle and high schools.  They are principals and superintendents of school districts in Vermont and elsewhere in the nation.  They are Deans of Students, faculty, student affairs professionals and administrators at colleges and universities.  They work in public arts programs, museums, galleries, and health, education, justice and social service agencies.  They are enrolled in Masters and Doctoral programs in the fine arts, music, education, social work, art therapy, family therapy, family law and counseling.  They are employed in social work positions in hospice centers, the Department of Immigration Services, Northeastern Family Institute, the Vermont Department of Social and Rehabilitation Services, and in other health, education, justice and social service agencies. 2  They work in the human services or strive to improve the quality of the workplace in the private sector, museums, foundations, or health, educational, and governmental agencies.  They direct youth programs in alternative educational settings, teach in the Peace Corps, and work in museums, science centers, software companies and government educational agencies. CESS graduates are everywhere, striving to make a positive difference in the lives of others. F. Ability to Self-Development Based on self-development, Nguyen Van De (2012) stated that developing the teacher staff of Cuu Long Delta universities to meet requirements for tertiary education renovations, they consider the following: (1) Detailing theories of human resource management in research, planning and anticipating teacher staff development in the context of tertiary education renovations of Vietnam in general and in particular the Cuu Long Delta area, in which the stress was placed on the issue of teacher staff development (including recruitment, educating, training, retraining, strongly improving each and every faculty, together with related policies for working efficacy). Especially, the research has generalized and pointed out experiences in teacher staff development from countries around the world. These are significant to help universities actively build their own teacher staff developing strategies, both short and long-terms, responding to the increasing requirements in education and training; (2) Evaluating the current situation and presenting: The overall picture of the tertiary education and the teacher staff of Cuu Long Delta universities; The current situation of teacher staff development, strengths and weaknesses, success extent, weaknesses causes, shortcomings of the approaches which have been taken by Cuu Long Delta universities; (3) Building a new model of the college instructor’s qualities in knowledge economy; addressing requirements on the instructor’s virtues and 4 categories of ability (of taking actions, autonomy, socialization and communication) to meet the need for the fundamental, overall 2 tertiary education renovations. Particularly, the thesis identified 3 urgent necessities in training and retraining the teacher staff of Cuu Long Delta universities; accordingly, suggesting concrete solutions to help them develop the teacher staff’s virtues and abilities, which is considered to be a fundamental, decisive factor for every instructor to reach the region and world standards; (4) Of the discussed solutions, the particular one of linking the teacher staffs of all the Cuu Long Delta universities for a network has identified 3 principles and 9 contents in collaboration. In addition, the thesis detailed the working disciplines within the network on the basis of ensuring the mutual agreements of the universities leaders and those of Southwest, Vietnam. This is to help push up the quality as well as the wider training fields of each single school and the entire college system in the region, closely related to the features of the Cuu Long Delta area for tertiary education renovations; (5) The thesis has come up with the new ideas about open working management, enhancing the autonomy, self- responsibility of Cuu Long Delta universities to develop the teacher staffs on the basis of collaboration and networking. The findings are intended to make significant contributions to Vietnam’s fundamental and entire tertiary education renovations. They can be applied widely to developing the teacher staff of Cuu Long Delta universities. The solutions are compatible with the Education and Training policies of enhancing university autonomy and self-responsibility. The initial results from developing the teacher staffs in some Cuu Long Delta universities can be duplicated in other schools elsewhere. The thesis findings also lead to further research in the field of tertiary education management: (1) Universities’ managements of teacher staffs’ quality; (2) Evaluation of universities’ training efficiency to meet the society’s demand. Before the time, Do Thi Hoa conducted a research about policy of non-public university lecturer development. In this regard, the Research Center of University Education and Occupation, Vietnam Institute of Scientific Education made a proposed framework policy of 2 lecturer development at non-public universities in our country today. They are as follows: - Analyzing the theory about framework policy of lecturer development at non-public universities (DHNCL) in our country in the current period; - Presenting the framework policy of lecturer development situation at non-public universities in our country today - Presentation the lecturers at non-public universities in our country today; - Proposing the framework policy of lecturer development (DNGV) at non-public universities. Dinh Thi Hong Hai (Journal of Educational science, Number 76, January 2012) said the following solutions for teaching staff quality improvement at Hanoi Community College: The author proposed some management measures for quality improvement in staff development at Hanoi Community College in 2010-2020. Nguyen Minh Duong (Journal of Educational science, Number 76, January 2012) wrote: System approach in study of human resources development. This article addresses the system approach in research on human recourses development. According to the author, besides the components of human resources development there are also relationships and impacts of external factors to be considered. Education Development Strategy through 2020 VGP – Prime Minister Nguyen Tan Dung has ratified the Education Development Strategy for the 2011-2020 period in a bid to raise the quality of education. Under the strategy, Vietnam expects to complete the universalization of pre-school education for five- year-old children by 2015. In terms of vocational and tertiary education, 70% of the laborers will graduate from vocational training courses and universities by 2020. By 2020, 25% of lecturers at universities and 8% at colleges are PhD. To achieve the targets, the country will enhance management over education quality and develop independent education quality control 2 system. Tran Van Tung (Abstract of Scientific Education Journal, No.83, May 8-2012, Science and Education Publisher) said about the quality of lecturers and university training of Vietnam. On the basis of actual teaching activities of Vietnamese university lecturers, the author proposed some solutions to improve the quality of these lecturers; training solutions; recruitment solutions; international collaboration solutions and measures to assess the quality of teachers according to the learning outcomes of students. The group of authors: Nguyen Huu Chau (Editor), Dinh Quang Bao, Bui Manh Nhi, Nguyen Duc Tri, Le Van Anh, Pham Quang Sang (Strategy and Educational Program Institute; Educational Publisher; 2008) wrote about Educational Quality: theoretical and practical problems: Educational quality is a problem of social concern because of its importance to the development of the country in general and of educational in particular. All educational activities are aimed to contribute to the ensurance and improving the quality of educational and an educational system in any country is also a qualified educational system. Awareness of the nature of concepts and the conduct of the quality review to come up to specific or general conclusions and looking for solutions to improve quality are not simple. The issue of educational quality so far has always been of the interest and international level. Different perspectives often leads to different opinions about the educational quality evaluation. It is necessary to understand fully the educational quality and the educational quality assessment so as to have scientific methods, advanced assessment procedures, in accordance with the social development, educational development in a particular context which is an urgent need of educational system of the country. Based on the results of a scientific research program on the educational and training quality, the group of authors has compiled the book in order to provide readers with the basic concepts about (1) Educational quality, the basic elements of educational quality, basic 2 criteria and indicators of educational quality; (2) the concept of educational evaluation, criteria and indicators, a number of methods and techniques to evaluate the quality of educational; (3) process of investigation, evaluation of the quality of educational; and (4) assessment method of some basic educational elements; The book also mentioned some practical issues taking place so as to propose a number of measures to improve the educational quality for general education, professional education, higher education. Based on the study conducted by Nguyen Thi Tuyet (2008) which was published in Journal Science of Social Sciences Hanoi National University and Humanities 24, the Criteria for performance of staff must show: An overall and accurate evaluation of lecturer's capacity which is an important factor in promoting lecturer's self-development, helping to improve the quality of university teaching. However, in Vietnam, annual evaluation of lecturer's capacity is considered formalism, non-objective and sometimes inaccurate. As an additional tool to assist management consultants in evaluating lecturers, this article presents criteria for evaluating lecturers in three aspects: teaching, scientific research and social contribution based on lecturer evaluation criteria applied in developed countries around the world. RESEARCH PARADIGM 3 Independent Variables Dependent Variable The profiles of the academic staff of Hong Duc University in terms of: - Age - Gender, - Civil status -Educational attainment - Length of service family income The professional characteristics of the quality of the academic staff of Hong Duc University as perceived by the respondents in terms of: - Work attitudes - mastery of the subject matters - Pedagogical ability - Ability to conduct scientific researches; - Ability of supplying social services; and - Ability of self- development? ACADEMIC STAFF DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM Figure 1.Research paradigm showing the interplay between the IV and DV. For a better understanding of this research work a research paradigm was presented using the interplay between the Independent and Dependent Variables. This shows a simplified pattern to illustrate the theoretical points, presenting the underlying assumptions and intellectual structure upon which this piece of research work and development in the field of inquiry is based. The Independent variables show the profiles of the academic staff of Hong Duc University in terms of: Age, Gender, Civil status, Educational attainment, Length of service, and family 3 income. While the Dependent Variables show the The professional characteristics of the quality of the academic staff of Hong Duc University as perceived by the respondents in terms of: Work attitudes, mastery of the subject matters, pedagogical ability, ability to conduct scientific researches, ability of supplying social services; and ability of self-development. These serve as Basis for Academic Staff Development Program. 3 CHAPTER III METHODOLOGY This chapter deals with the locale of the study, research design, population and sampling, data gathering procedures, and statistical treatment used in the study. LOCALE OF THE STUDY Source: 3 This study was conducted at Hong Duc University in Thanh Hoa province: 13 acacdemic departments of Hong Duc universyti, Thanh Hoa province. The university which was under survey was: Hong Duc university (565), address: Quang Trung ward – Thanh Hoa City. Research design This study used the descriptive correlation design in analyzing the investigated variables. It is designed to help determine the extent to which different variables are related to each other in the population of interest and state that the critical distinguishing characteristics are the effort to estimate a relationship, as distinguished from simple description. Respondents of the study The research was tested on/applied to all lecturers of 13 acacdemic departments and other department of Hong Duc university, Thanh Hoa province via a survey technique with the participation of both department leaders and staff. All of the staff rated by leaders were asked to answer the survey questions. Research instrumentation This study used the quantitative methods. This method helps to provide the quantified background data. The collected data and information lay the foundation for the study. Comments, remarks, assumptions and conclusions of the study are based on data analysis. Data collections for analysis in the study come from educational managers in Hong Duc University in Thanh Hoa province by Survey questionnaires, Interviews and discussion. The researcher adapted a questionnaire which was the main tool in gathering data. An unstructured interview was also conducted to cross check the participants’ responses. Validation By questionnaire, the authors asked the opinions of educational management officials and leaders of a number of departments who took part in state management in education in the city. Number of issued sheets and revenue sheets. 3 The Questionnaire was designed to ask opinions of the selection preferred solutions, assessment of the necessity and feasibility of the solutions, to enhance the city-level State management in education in Hong Duc university in Thanh Hoa province in the of in period of industrialization-modernization. Data gathering procedure The actual data gathering procedures was done through several processes. After the finalization of the instrument, the researcher asked the permission of the heads and deans to administer the questionnaire by sending them a letter of request for permission. After being accepted by them, the researcher scheduled to visit to the departments to distribute the questionnaires. Statistical treatment Data The following statistical tests were used in the computation of the gathered data. The formulas are given below: Formula: 1. Percentage (%) .100 f P N  Where: P = Percentage distribution f = frequency X = scale N = Total number of respondents 2. Weighted Arithmetic Mean 1 1 2 2 1 1 2 1 ... ... k i i k k i k k i i f x f x f x f x X f f f f             Where: 3 X = Weighted Arithmetic Mean 1 k i i i f x   = sum of all the products of f and x, where f is the frequency of each option and x is the weight of each option 1 k i i f   = sum of all the subjects The researcher adapted the rating scale below and its descriptive/qualitative interpretation for the questionnaire that were used in the survey. 3. Multiple regressions The formula is: Y = A + b1X1 + b2X2 Where: Y = dependent variable being predicted or explained A = constant or intercept bn = expected frequencies X1 = independent variable explaining the variance of Y The statistical analysis was done using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS), now also known as Predictive Analysis Software. 4. Chi-square test, Identify which of the profile of the respondents predict professional characteristics of the academic staff of Hong Duc University. The formula is: X2 = ∑ Where: X2 = chi-square value 0 = observed frequencies E = Expected frequencies If p-value smaller than 0.05 then reject null hypothesis 3 If p-value larger than 0.05 then accept null hypothesis Descriptive Interpretation of the Scale The following table of interpretation were used to rate the variables of the Personal Profiles of the Academic Staff as Predictors of Professional Characteristics. Based on the review of literature and related study, the researcher designed a set of questionnaire checklist for data collection. Table 1 Scale of values Scale Choice Description Range Verbal interpretation 5 Very good 4.20 - 5.00 Very good (VG) 4 Good 3.40 - 4.19 Good (G) 3 Normal 2.60 - 3.39 Normal (N) 2 Weak 1.80 - 2.59 Weak (W) 1 Not applicable 1.00 - 1.79 Not applicable (NA) 3 Chapter IV RESULTS AND DISCUSSIONS This chapter presents the data on tables with their corresponding analysis and interpretation. The presentation followed the sequence of the specific problem. The quality and capacity of teaching staff: The content of teacher evaluation criteria are based on the Law on Education, Article 14 of the university and the text of the education and training provisions qualities, qualifications of teachers, were raised for discussion of this thesis, and the evaluation criteria were also closely targeted innovation and comprehensive basic university education in Vietnam during 2006 - 2020 under Resolution 14/NQ- CP of the Government. From that evaluation criteria are specified by the content on the surface: morals, professional attitude scientific passion, knowledge, abilities, and self- development of the faculty. The organization of evaluating the merits and capabilities of the faculty is done through questionnaires for the 13 departments of the faculty and other department of the University of Hong Duc. School Department is directly managing the faculty, so their reviews will hopefully help us look closely on the actual quality of the faculty at the university. At the same time, the thesis also conducted for 508 teachers (in the respective units which assessed the subjects) , the M form , Section - Appendix 1, to their self-assessment of her at the same time 9/2013 in order to have a comparison. Statistics survey in 13 faculties of the University of Hong Duc for the assessment of the quality and capacity of faculty, as follows: 3 Table 2 Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Age Frequency Percent 21-30 yrs 118 23,2 31-40 yrs 220 43,3 41-50 yrs 132 26,0 51-60 yrs 38 7,5 Valid Total 508 100,0 Table 2 presents the frequency distribution of the respondents’ profile in terms of their age. It shows that the age range of most staff’ in Hong Duc University including teaching and non-teaching were ranging from 36-45 years old in which catered 43.3 percent of the whole distribution. It was followed by age ranging from 46-55 years old in which catered 26 percent of the respondents’ distribution and minute difference in percentage from age ranging 26-35 years old with 23.2 percent. And there were staff whose age bracket were near the retirement age of 56 and above that catered only 7.5 percent. It reveals that the most of the professors and managers of the Hong Duc University were at the age of they are developing their educational growth. In which in this stage of their life, they are proving to be an expert for the later future. 3 Table 3 Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Gender Table 3 presents the frequency distribution of the respondents’ profile in terms of their gender. It shows that most of the Hong Duc University Staff were male which catered 57.5 percent of the whole distribution and female respondents catered the rest 42.5 percent in which a clear indication of the university professor in Hong Duc is not made too much difference in the number of managers and professors who can manage and teach in college or university. This implies that female can also do teaching. However, nowadays, females are given equal chance to do teaching and other government employment, hence; teaching job and other types of work for men and women were now highly accepted with equality and no discrimination. Table 4 Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Civil status Frequency Percent married 456 89,8 Not married 45 8,9 discoved 7 1,4 Valid Total 508 100,0 Frequency Percent Valid Percent Cumulative Percent Male 216 42,5 42,5 42,5 Female 292 57,5 57,5 100,0 Valid Total 508 100,0 100,0 4 Table 4 presents the frequency distribution of the respondents’ profile in terms of their civil status. It shows that most of the respondents were married which catered 89,8 percent of the whole distribution. And only 8,9 percent catered as single respondents or only 45 and seven or 1.4 were widow or widower. It reveals that the academic staff of Hong Duc University were at the stable stage in which living with their partner and having family. It also reveals that they were now prioritizing family so that stable job in Hong Duc University is also taking good care of them. Table 5 Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Highest Education attainment Frequency Percent University 211 41,5 Master 235 46,3 Doctoral 62 12,2 Valid Total 508 100,0 Table 5 presents the frequency distribution of the respondents’ profile in terms of their highest educational attainment. It shows that most of the academic staff or professor/lecturer in Hong Duc University have at least attain their master’s degree which catered 46.3 percent with a minute difference in the academic staff who are stagnant with their bachelor degree which catered 41.5 percent. And 12.2 percent were catered only the academic staff who were attained their doctorate degree. Though in University the major qualification is that the professor or lecturer must at least attained or earned masters’ degree, the result of this study clearly indicate that this qualification in not totally practiced that there are professors teaching college students but not taking up higher than their bachelor. 4 Table 6 Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Respondents' Profile in Terms of Length of service Frequency Percent 1-10 yrs 148 29,1 11-20 yrs 141 27,8 21-30 yrs 172 33,9 31-40 yrs 47 9,3 Valid Total 508 100,0 Table 6 presents frequency distribution of the respondents’ profile in terms of their length of service. It shows that the academic staff of the Hong Duc University mostly serves the university for not higher than 10 years in which 33.9 percent catered or serve for less than 10 years but not more than 5 years. It was followed by the academic staffs who serve the university for almost 2 years which catered 29.1 percent and 2years to less than 5 years were catered 27.8 percent in minute difference with the succeeding years. And only 9.3 percent were serve for more than 10 years in which clear indication of the age of the university. It reveals that the academic staff of the university has prestige with their stay in university with long term of experience in teaching. It also indicates that skills hones through experiences. Table 7 Frequency and Percentage Distribution of the Respondents' Profile in Te... Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) 1.026 .306 3.355 .001 Q11 .022 .042 .023 .512 .609 Q12 -.050 .047 -.049 -1.056 .291 Q13 .217 .070 .158 3.099 .002 Q14 -.009 .058 -.008 -.162 .871 1 Q15 .046 .039 .053 1.173 .241 a. Dependent Variable: Highest Educational attainment Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q15, Q14, Q11, Q12, Q13a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Length of service Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q15, Q14, Q11, Q12, Q13a . Enter 1 .283a .080 .071 .938 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q15, Q14, Q11, Q12, Q13 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 38.562 5 7.712 8.759 .000a Residual 442.028 502 .881 1 Total 480.591 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q15, Q14, Q11, Q12, Q13 b. Dependent Variable: Length of service Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) 1.100 .431 2.553 .011 Q11 .140 .060 .103 2.340 .020 Q12 -.065 .067 -.044 -.967 .334 Q13 .518 .099 .261 5.250 .000 Q14 -.227 .082 -.130 -2.782 .006 1 Q15 .047 .055 .038 .862 .389 a. Dependent Variable: Length of service Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q15, Q14, Q11, Q12, Q13a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q15, Q14, Q11, Q12, Q13a . Enter b. Dependent Variable: Monthly income Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .181a .033 .023 1.020 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q15, Q14, Q11, Q12, Q13 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 17.742 5 3.548 3.413 .005a Residual 521.975 502 1.040 1 Total 539.717 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q15, Q14, Q11, Q12, Q13 b. Dependent Variable: Monthly income Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) 2.148 .468 4.586 .000 Q11 .085 .065 .059 1.307 .192 Q12 -.026 .073 -.016 -.355 .723 Q13 .336 .107 .160 3.134 .002 Q14 -.147 .089 -.080 -1.655 .099 1 Q15 .063 .060 .048 1.055 .292 a. Dependent Variable: Monthly income Variables Entered/Removedb Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) 2.148 .468 4.586 .000 Q11 .085 .065 .059 1.307 .192 Q12 -.026 .073 -.016 -.355 .723 Q13 .336 .107 .160 3.134 .002 Q14 -.147 .089 -.080 -1.655 .099 1 Q15 .063 .060 .048 1.055 .292 Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Age Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .187a .035 .025 .861 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 13.497 5 2.699 3.637 .003a Residual 372.558 502 .742 1 Total 386.055 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19 b. Dependent Variable: Age Coefficientsa Model Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients t Sig. B Std. Error Beta (Constant) 1.649 .353 4.669 .000 Q16 .096 .058 .081 1.669 .096 Q17 -.033 .063 -.026 -.523 .601 Q18 -.120 .058 -.093 -2.060 .040 Q19 .066 .075 .052 .885 .377 1 Q20 .154 .082 .108 1.888 .060 a. Dependent Variable: Age Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Gender Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .256a .065 .056 .481 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 8.127 5 1.625 7.032 .000a Residual 116.031 502 .231 1 Total 124.157 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19 b. Dependent Variable: Gender Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) 2.109 .197 10.697 .000 Q16 -.049 .032 -.072 -1.514 .131 Q17 .014 .035 .019 .389 .698 Q18 .066 .033 .091 2.042 .042 Q19 -.046 .042 -.064 -1.093 .275 1 Q20 -.153 .046 -.189 -3.352 .001 a. Dependent Variable: Gender Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Civil status Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .262a .069 .059 .350 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 4.544 5 .909 7.407 .000a Residual 61.603 502 .123 1 Total 66.148 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19 b. Dependent Variable: Civil status Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) 1.486 .144 10.343 .000 Q16 -.120 .023 -.244 -5.117 .000 Q17 .018 .025 .035 .724 .470 Q18 -.027 .024 -.050 -1.120 .263 Q19 .016 .031 .030 .508 .612 1 Q20 .019 .033 .033 .583 .560 a. Dependent Variable: Civil status Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Highest Educational attainment Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .140a .020 .010 .669 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 4.509 5 .902 2.014 .075a Residual 224.788 502 .448 1 Total 229.297 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19 b. Dependent Variable: Highest Educational attainment Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) 1.330 .274 4.846 .000 Q16 .064 .045 .070 1.429 .154 Q17 .005 .049 .005 .094 .925 Q18 -.073 .045 -.074 -1.618 .106 Q19 .056 .058 .058 .968 .333 1 Q20 .064 .063 .059 1.015 .311 a. Dependent Variable: Highest Educational attainment Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Length of service Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .199a .039 .030 .959 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 18.949 5 3.790 4.121 .001a Residual 461.641 502 .920 1 Total 480.591 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 18.949 5 3.790 4.121 .001a Residual 461.641 502 .920 1 Total 480.591 507 b. Dependent Variable: Length of service Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) 2.009 .393 5.110 .000 Q16 .148 .064 .112 2.305 .022 Q17 -.044 .070 -.031 -.628 .531 Q18 -.208 .065 -.145 -3.199 .001 Q19 .093 .084 .065 1.108 .269 1 Q20 .082 .091 .051 .896 .371 a. Dependent Variable: Length of service Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Monthly income Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .117a .014 .004 1.030 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 7.387 5 1.477 1.393 .225a Residual 532.329 502 1.060 1 Total 539.717 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q20, Q17, Q18, Q16, Q19 b. Dependent Variable: Monthly income Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) 2.816 .422 6.669 .000 Q16 .112 .069 .080 1.629 .104 Q17 -.028 .075 -.019 -.376 .707 Q18 -.113 .070 -.074 -1.618 .106 Q19 .033 .090 .022 .372 .710 1 Q20 .056 .098 .033 .572 .568 a. Dependent Variable: Monthly income Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Age Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .244a .060 .050 .850 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 23.023 5 4.605 6.367 .000a Residual 363.033 502 .723 1 Total 386.055 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22 b. Dependent Variable: Age Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) .597 .404 1.479 .140 Q21 -.059 .077 -.044 -.764 .446 Q22 .108 .079 .081 1.370 .171 Q23 .064 .057 .052 1.133 .258 Q24 .317 .080 .206 3.958 .000 1 Q25 .049 .091 .028 .540 .589 a. Dependent Variable: Age Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Gender Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .243a .059 .050 .482 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. 1 Regression 7.313 5 1.463 6.284 .000a Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .243a .059 .050 .482 Residual 116.845 502 .233 Total 124.157 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22 b. Dependent Variable: Gender Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) 2.327 .229 10.165 .000 Q21 .037 .043 .049 .845 .398 Q22 -.051 .045 -.067 -1.142 .254 Q23 .008 .032 .012 .261 .794 Q24 -.132 .045 -.151 -2.901 .004 1 Q25 -.100 .051 -.102 -1.953 .051 a. Dependent Variable: Gender Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Civil status Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .275a .076 .067 .349 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22 ANOVAb Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .275a .076 .067 .349 Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 5.009 5 1.002 8.226 .000a Residual 61.138 502 .122 1 Total 66.148 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22 b. Dependent Variable: Civil status Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) 1.705 .166 10.294 .000 Q21 -.074 .031 -.136 -2.361 .019 Q22 -.070 .032 -.127 -2.171 .030 Q23 -.032 .023 -.062 -1.375 .170 Q24 -.049 .033 -.076 -1.482 .139 1 Q25 .067 .037 .094 1.813 .070 a. Dependent Variable: Civil status Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Highest Educational attainment Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .276a .076 .067 .649 Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22a . Enter a. Predictors: (Constant), Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 17.530 5 3.506 8.311 .000a Residual 211.767 502 .422 1 Total 229.297 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22 b. Dependent Variable: Highest Educational attainment Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) .431 .308 1.397 .163 Q21 -.045 .059 -.044 -.773 .440 Q22 .055 .060 .054 .917 .360 Q23 .067 .043 .070 1.553 .121 Q24 .313 .061 .264 5.130 .000 1 Q25 -.002 .069 -.002 -.035 .972 a. Dependent Variable: Highest Educational attainment Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) .431 .308 1.397 .163 Q21 -.045 .059 -.044 -.773 .440 Q22 .055 .060 .054 .917 .360 Q23 .067 .043 .070 1.553 .121 Q24 .313 .061 .264 5.130 .000 1 Q25 -.002 .069 -.002 -.035 .972 b. Dependent Variable: Length of service Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .261a .068 .059 .944 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 32.818 5 6.564 7.358 .000a Residual 447.773 502 .892 1 Total 480.591 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22 b. Dependent Variable: Length of service Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) .388 .448 .865 .387 Q21 -.109 .085 -.074 -1.275 .203 Q22 .105 .088 .070 1.195 .232 1 Q23 .126 .063 .091 1.996 .047 Q24 .384 .089 .223 4.320 .000 Q25 .053 .101 .027 .525 .600 a. Dependent Variable: Length of service Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Monthly income Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .171a .029 .020 1.022 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 15.873 5 3.175 3.042 .010a Residual 523.844 502 1.044 1 Total 539.717 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q25, Q21, Q23, Q24, Q22 b. Dependent Variable: Monthly income Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) 1.563 .485 3.225 .001 Q21 -.055 .092 -.035 -.599 .550 1 Q22 .093 .095 .059 .983 .326 Q23 .132 .068 .089 1.927 .055 Q24 .246 .096 .135 2.562 .011 Q25 .014 .109 .007 .127 .899 a. Dependent Variable: Monthly income Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Age Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .236a .055 .046 .852 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 21.415 5 4.283 5.896 .000a Residual 364.640 502 .726 1 Total 386.055 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27 b. Dependent Variable: Age Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. 1 (Constant) .622 .450 1.382 .168 Q26 .117 .087 .097 1.346 .179 Q27 .211 .103 .139 2.051 .041 Q28 -.029 .082 -.021 -.361 .718 Q29 .216 .078 .129 2.776 .006 Q30 -.062 .074 -.047 -.831 .406 a. Dependent Variable: Age Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Gender Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .281a .079 .070 .477 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 9.780 5 1.956 8.585 .000a Residual 114.377 502 .228 1 Total 124.157 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27 b. Dependent Variable: Gender Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. 1 (Constant) 2.848 .252 11.306 .000 Q26 -.126 .049 -.184 -2.597 .010 Q27 -.105 .058 -.122 -1.825 .069 Q28 -.064 .046 -.079 -1.406 .160 Q29 -.104 .044 -.109 -2.377 .018 Q30 .032 .041 .043 .781 .435 a. Dependent Variable: Gender Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Civil status Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .197a .039 .029 .356 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 2.569 5 .514 4.058 .001a Residual 63.578 502 .127 1 Total 66.148 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27 b. Dependent Variable: Civil status Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. 1 (Constant) 1.684 .188 8.968 .000 Q26 .047 .036 .094 1.296 .195 Q27 -.087 .043 -.138 -2.019 .044 Q28 -.053 .034 -.089 -1.549 .122 Q29 -.026 .033 -.038 -.810 .419 Q30 -.042 .031 -.077 -1.353 .177 a. Dependent Variable: Civil status Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Highest Educational attainment Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .230a .053 .044 .658 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 12.170 5 2.434 5.627 .000a Residual 217.128 502 .433 1 Total 229.297 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27 b. Dependent Variable: Highest Educational attainment Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) .780 .347 2.248 .025 Q26 .000 .067 .000 -.011 .992 Q27 .259 .079 .221 3.262 .001 Q28 -.056 .063 -.051 -.888 .375 Q29 .115 .060 .090 1.919 .056 1 Q30 -.035 .057 -.034 -.612 .541 a. Dependent Variable: Highest Educational attainment Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Length of service Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .271a .073 .064 .942 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 35.237 5 7.047 7.944 .000a Residual 445.354 502 .887 1 Total 480.591 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27 b. Dependent Variable: Length of service Coefficientsa Model Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients t Sig. B Std. Error Beta (Constant) .224 .497 .450 .653 Q26 .120 .096 .089 1.249 .212 Q27 .297 .114 .175 2.610 .009 Q28 .008 .090 .005 .092 .927 Q29 .319 .086 .171 3.704 .000 1 Q30 -.163 .082 -.111 -1.987 .047 a. Dependent Variable: Length of service Variables Entered/Removedb Model Variables Entered Variables Removed Method 1 Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27a . Enter a. All requested variables entered. b. Dependent Variable: Monthly income Model Summary Model R R Square Adjusted R Square Std. Error of the Estimate 1 .180a .032 .023 1.020 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27 ANOVAb Model Sum of Squares df Mean Square F Sig. Regression 17.456 5 3.491 3.356 .005a Residual 522.260 502 1.040 1 Total 539.717 507 a. Predictors: (Constant), Q30, Q26, Q29, Q28, Q27 b. Dependent Variable: Monthly income Coefficientsa Unstandardized Coefficients Standardized Coefficients Model B Std. Error Beta t Sig. (Constant) 1.358 .538 2.522 .012 Q26 .096 .104 .068 .928 .354 Q27 .180 .123 .100 1.465 .144 Q28 .033 .098 .020 .342 .733 Q29 .264 .093 .134 2.833 .005 1 Q30 -.102 .089 -.065 -1.146 .252 a. Dependent Variable: Monthly income APPENDICE B QUESTIONNAIRE FOR ACADEMIC STAFF 20 April 2013 Dear Respondents, Good day! I would like to request for your assistance to accomplish the following questions regarding my research entitled “Personal Profiles of the Academic Staff as Predictors of Professional Characteristics: Basis for Staff Development Program” which is a requirement in completing my degree leading to Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) in Educational Management under the joint program of Southern Luzon State University, the Philippines and Thai Nguyen University, Vietnam. Please be informed that your response to the questionnaire will remain completely confidential. It is only for research purposes. Thank you. Yours respectfully, Lai Van Chinh (Terry) Researcher PART I - PERSONAL DATA OF ACADEMIC STAFF Please answer the following questions by putting a check mark  to the corresponding responses or filling in the blanks the items with needed information: Name: _______________________________________________________________ (optional) Position: ____________________________________________________________________ Department/Office: ___________________________________________________________ Age: 21 to 30 31-40 41-50 51-60 61 and above Gender : Male Female Civil status: Married Not married Divorced Highest Educational attainment: Bachelor degree Master’s degree Doctoral degree. Length of service: 01 to 10 years 11 to 20 years 21 to 30 years 31 to 40 years Family income (monthly): Below 3 Million VND 3 to 5 Million VND 5.1 to 7. Million VND More than 7 Million VND PART II Level Statements (5) (4) (3) (2) (1) Working attitude 1. Respecting the standards, behaviors and rules. 2. Being aware of maintaining and building the reputation 3. Being aware of protecting, defending and implementing the rules of ethnic teachers. 4. Having a good lifestyle and behavior, being a role model for students 5. Being ambitious and keen on teaching and researching Mastery of the subject matter 1. Basic and Specialized knowledge 2. Psychological and educational knowledge 3. Knowledge of management and international integration 4. Knowledge of the policy and guidelines of the Viet nam Communist Party 5. Methods of testing and evaluating the results of students Pedagogical Ability 1. Ability of designing and planning the lectures 2. Ability of applying technology, teaching materials and information 3. Ability of organizing, monitoring and getting feedback, evaluating from students 4. Ability of motivating, and maintaining the interest and participation of the learners 5. Deploying educational programs and organizing scientific research activity ability Scientific Research Ability 1. Ability of deciding research topics and researching independently 2. Ability of collecting and processing data and information 3. Ability of analyzing and combining research results 4. Ability of writing reports and stating research results, defending views and scientific thesis 5. Ability of organizing scientific workshop and giving feedback to scientific works Ability of supplying social services 1. Ability of determining and forecasting social needs 2. Ability of giving advice for society 3. Ability of establishing the relationship with society 4. Ability of supplying various services for society 5. Ability of conducting mission services for the society Ability of self-developing 1. Ability of self-studying to develop specialized knowledge 2. Ability of doing scientific research and experiencing initiatives 3. Ability of collecting, exchanging and analyzing information to update knowledge 4. Ability of furthering higher education to become leading experts of the university 5. Ability of adapting intelligence to the educational environment to solve problems QUESTIONNAIRE FOR ACADEMIC STAFF 20 April 2013 Dear Respondents, Good day! I would like to request for your assistance to accomplish the following questions regarding my research entitled “Personal Profiles of the Academic Staff as Predictors of Professional Characteristics: Basis for Staff Development Program” which is a requirement in completing my degree leading to Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D) in Educational Management under the joint program of Southern Luzon State University, the Philippines and Thai Nguyen University, Vietnam. Please be informed that your response to the questionnaire will remain completely confidential. It is only for research purposes. Thank you. Yours respectfully, Lai Van Chinh (Terry) Researcher QUESTIONNAIRE FOR ACADEMIC STAFF PART I - PERSONAL DATA OF ACADEMIC STAFF Please answer the following questions by putting a check mark  to the corresponding responses or fill in the blanks the items with needed information: Name: _______________________________________________________________ (optional) Position: ____________________________________________________________________ Department/Office: ___________________________________________________________ Age: 21 to 30 31-40 41-50 51-60 61 and above Gender : Male Female Civil status: Married Not married Divorced Highest Educational attainment: Bachelor degree Master’s degree Doctoral degree. Length of service: 01 to 10 years 11 to 20 years 21 to 30 years 31 to 40 years Family income (monthly): Below 3 Million VND 3 to 5 Million VND 5.1 to 7. Million VND More than 7 Million VND PART II Level Statements (5) (4) (3) (2) (1) Working attitude 1. Respecting the standards, behaviors and rules. 2. Being aware of maintaining and building the reputation 3. Being aware of protecting, defending and implementing the rules of ethnic teachers. 4. Having a good lifestyle and behavior, being a role model for students 5. Being ambitious and keen on teaching and researching Mastery of the subject matter 1. Basic and Specialized knowledge 2. Psychological and educational knowledge 3. Knowledge of management and international integration 4. Knowledge of the policy and guidelines of the Viet nam Communist Party 5. Methods of testing and evaluating the results of students Pedagogical Ability 1. Ability of designing and planning the lectures 2. Ability of applying technology, teaching materials and information 3. Ability of organizing, monitoring and getting feedback, evaluating from students 4. Ability of motivating, and maintaining the interest and participation of the learners 5. Deploying educational programs and organizing scientific research activity ability Scientific Research Ability 1. Ability of deciding research topics and researching independently 2. Ability of collecting and processing data and information 3. Ability of analyzing and combining research results 4. Ability of writing reports and stating research results, defending views and scientific thesis 5. Ability of organizing scientific workshop and giving feedback to scientific works Ability of supplying social services 1. Ability of determining and forecasting social needs 2. Ability of giving advice for society 3. Ability of establishing the relationship with society 4. Ability of supplying various services for society 5. Ability of conducting mission services for the society Ability of self-developing 1. Ability of self-studying to develop specialized knowledge 2. Ability of doing scientific research and experiencing initiatives 3. Ability of collecting, exchanging and analyzing information to update knowledge 4. Ability of furthering higher education to become leading experts of the university 5. Ability of adapting intelligence to the educational environment to solve problems CURRICULUM VITAE LAI VAN CHINH- (TERRY) Tel. No. 0373910222 CP. No. 0916585456 e-mail: chinhhd@yahoo.com, laivanchinh@hdu.edu.vn  PERSONAL DATA Name : LAI VAN CHINH- (TERRY) Present Address : Đong Son St. Thanh Hoa City Home Address : Dong Son St. Thanh Hoa City Birthdate : December 20, 1974 Birthplace : Nga Son District, Thanh Hoa Province Gender : Male Civil Status : Married Nationality : Vietnamese Languages Spoken : Vietnamese  EDUCATION M.A Tertiary High School Secondary Elementary : : : : : M.A of Education Management - Vinh University Ha Noi National University of education. Ba Dinh High School, Nga Son District, Thanh Hoa Province Nga Truong Secondary School, Nga Son District, Thanh Hoa Province Nga Truong Elementary school, Nga Son District, Thanh Hoa Province C.WORK EXPERIENCE From april 4, 1999 to 2014 Hong Duc University in Thanh Hoa province

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